Nutrition is not about just feeding people, it is about fuelling growth - the growth of individuals, communities, and entire nations. Malnutrition - whether it results from a lack of nutrients, the overconsuption of calories or a poor quality diet - inhibits people from thriving. Without a healthy population, nations cannot reach their full potential.

How can agriculture and food systems policies improve nutrition?

Food and agriculture policies are critical in influencing what foods are available and accessible to consumers. As food systems evolve to address the challenges of population growth, global trade and environmental change, we should ensure that these systems do not just help to feed - they help no nourish.

In light of this, the Global Panel has published a technical brief which describes the breadth of policies relating to agriculture and food systems that influence nutritional outcomes for people, and the opportunities to make these more nutrition enhancing.

To improve nutrition for all, we need to make changes in the food we produce, and how it is processed, transported, marketed and consumed. Policy actions and investment across the food system can contribute to improving nutrition outcomes. Focusing on food systems, new policies can be developed, and all policies modified in four key domains:

AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTION 

MARKETS AND TRADE SYSTEMS 

CONSUMER PURCHASING POWER 

FOOD TRANSFORMATION AND CONSUMER DEMAND 

These four aspects of the food system shape the food environment within which people make food choices, which in turn determines the quality of their diet. Diet quality is a measure of good nutrition.

Technical Brief

The Global Panel published a technical brief: "How can Agriculture and Food System Policies improve Nutrition?”. The brief shows the breadth of policies relating to agriculture and food systems that influence nutritional outcomes for people and the opportunities to make these more nutrition - enhancing.

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Photo: World Bank
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PDF icon Food Systems & Nutrition brief3.75 MB
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